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B-Movie Scream Queen is the fourtenth song off the Murderdolls album Beyond the Valley of the Murderdolls.


LyricsEdit

Another dead girl on the tube

She's my Lilly Munster crawling from her tomb

Dark black circles around her eyes

Cold dead lips and a crooked spine

She's the living dead, she's a ghoulish fiend

She's the deadest girl of my dreams

Loving her is like a lobotomy

A late night creature feature starring you and me


She's evil as she wants to be

She's evil and she's meant for me


She's a B-movie scream queen

My monster girl on the screen

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yeah, oh no

She's a B-movie scream queen

My monster girl on the screen

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yeah, oh no



Welcome to my nightmare, face down in the dirt

The bride of Frankenstein, in a mini-skirt

And where she's going they don't know

But it's going direct to video

Smile for the camera, open up your eyes

My monster girl's too dead to die

She's evil walking on the silver screen

She scares me to death but that's what I need


She's evil as she wants to be

She's evil and she's meant for me


She's a B-movie scream queen

My monster girl on the screen

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yeah, oh no

She's a B-movie scream queen

My monster girl on the screen

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yeah, oh no


SOLO


My Morticia, the one for me

My Lilly Munster, pale as can be

My Vampira, my wicked bitch

My Elvira, getting so lovesick


She's evil as she wants to be

She's evil and she's meant for me



She's a B-Movie scream queen

My living dead evil thing

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yea, oh no

She's a B-Movie scream queen

My living dead evil thing

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yea, oh no

She's a B-Movie scream queen

My living dead evil thing

She's a B-Movie scream queen

Oh yea, oh no


I said oh no

B-MoviesEdit

A B movie is a low-budget commercial motion picture conceived neither as an arthouse film nor as pornography. In its original usage, during the so-called Golden Age of Hollywood, the term more precisely identified a film intended for distribution as the less-publicized, bottom half of a double feature. Although the U.S. production of movies intended as second features largely ceased by the end of the 1950s, the term B movie continued to be used in the broader sense it maintains today. In its post–Golden Age usage, there is ambiguity on both sides of the definition: on the one hand, many B movies display a high degree of craft and aesthetic ingenuity; on the other, the primary interest of many inexpensive exploitation films is prurient. In some cases, both are true.

In either usage, most B movies represent a particular genre—the Western was a Golden Age B movie staple, while low-budget science-fiction and horror films became more popular in the 1950s. Early B movies were often part of series in which the star repeatedly played the same character. Almost always shorter than the top-billed films they were paired with, many had running times of 70 minutes or less. The term connoted a general perception that B movies were inferior to the more handsomely budgeted headliners; individual B films were often ignored by critics. Latter-day B movies still sometimes inspire multiple sequels, but series are less common. As the average running time of top-of-the-line films increased, so did that of B pictures. In its current usage, the term has two primary and somewhat contradictory connotations: it may signal an opinion that a certain movie is (a) a genre film with minimal artistic ambitions or (b) a lively, energetic film uninhibited by the constraints imposed on more expensive projects and unburdened by the conventions of putatively "serious" independent film. The term is also now used loosely to refer to some higher budgeted, mainstream films with exploitation-style content, usually in genres traditionally associated with the B movie.

From their beginnings to the present day, B movies have provided opportunities both for those coming up in the profession and others whose careers are waning. Celebrated filmmakers such as Anthony Mann and Jonathan Demme learned their craft in B movies. B movies are where actors such as John Wayne and Jack Nicholson became established, and the Bs have also provided work for former A movie actors, such as Vincent Price and Karen Black. Some actors, such as Béla Lugosi and Pam Grier, worked in B movies for most of their careers.

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